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Here’s looking at ya!

Here’s one final photo from the June 4 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

Joan Marsh (1913-2000) had two careers in the movies. She was a child actress in silent films from 1915 to 1921. She started appearing again in films in 1930, mostly in supporting roles.

Her last film was in 1944; she eventually became manager of a stationery shop. She appears to have been involved in nothing particularly noteworthy or scandalous, which I guess is a good thing.

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It gets a coat of paint

Here’s a photo from the June 4 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star of an actress painting her bungalow.

Estelle Taylor (1894-1952) was a silent film star, appearing in movies regularly from 1919 to 1932. One journalist called her “the screen’s No. 1 oomph girl of the 1920s”, which I assume is a good thing.

Ms. Taylor was married to Jack Dempsey from 1925 to either 1930 or 1931 (sources vary). (Dempsey went on to marry Hannah Williams, previously mentioned in this blog.) In her later years, she was an animal rights activist.

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Land of the hula-hula

Here’s a photograph from the June 4 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star of a Broadway actress who was headed to Honolulu.

Gladys George (1904-1954) was the child of two British actors, and had been on the stage herself since the age of three. She was a stage star in the 1920s, and appeared in movies regularly in the 1930s. She was nominated for a Best Actress Academy Award in 1936 for Valiant Is The Word For Carrie.

She was married and divorced four times; her husbands included a millionaire paper manufacturer and a hotel bellboy who was twenty years younger. She battled an assortment of health problems and passed away from a cerebral hemorrhage.

I couldn’t find out what she was doing in Honolulu.

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Invading golfers

Here’s a photo from the June 4 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star of two golfers who were competing in a tournament in England.

I couldn’t find a biography of Wanda Morgan (1910-1995), but I found pictures of her here, here, here, and here. She competed regularly in events in England in the early 1930s.

Virginia Van Wie (1909-1997) won three consecutive U.S. Women’s Amateur golf tournaments from 1932 to 1934. She retired in 1935 and taught golf in the Chicago area for over thirty years.

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Buck Jones, film cowboy

Here’s another photo from the May 23 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star, featuring actor Buck Jones on a horse.

Needless to say, Buck Jones (1891-1942) had taken a stage name for the movies; he was born Charles Frederick Gebhart. After two tours of duty in the U.S. Army, ending in 1913, the future Mr. Jones became a cowboy, then a bit player and stuntman in the movies, and then a star in his own right. He was featured in westerns from 1920 right up until his death.

Jones was one of the 492 victims of the Cocoanut Grove nightclub fire in Boston on November 28, 1942 – the second-deadliest building fire in U.S. history. Some reports stated that he escaped the building, went back to help others, and was trapped; John Wayne, who listed Jones as his hero, was one of the people who believed this. The description of the events of the fire makes for horrifying reading.

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Little Leslie Ruth

Here’s a photograph from the May 23 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star of an actor’s daughter who was visiting her father.

Little Leslie Ruth Howard’s father was Leslie Howard (1893-1943), a British actor who was a major star in the 1930s. After appearing in Gone With The Wind in 1939, he returned to Britain to help produce anti-German propaganda and provide support for the Allies. On June 1 1943, he was on a BOAC plane flying from Lisbon to Bristol that was shot down. Reports differ on whether Howard, who was considered a propaganda asset, was targeted; a recent book claimed that the Germans did not know who was on the aircraft, and that shooting down the aircraft was simply an error in judgement.

Leslie Ruth Howard (1924-2013) appeared in at least one of her father’s films (sources vary as to which), and appeared in documentaries about Howard and his downed flight. Her biography of her father,  A Quite Remarkable Father: A Biography of Leslie Howard, was published in 1959.

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Lord Irwin at Port Hope

Here’s a photograph from the April 25 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star of a British peer who was visiting Toronto and Port Hope, Ontario.

Edward Wood (1881-1959) was the fourth son of the 2nd Viscount Halifax, but became his father’s heir when his three older brothers died between 1886 and 1890. He was born without a left hand, but employed a spring-loaded artificial hand that could hold reins or open gates, making it possible for him to ride a horse. He also could not pronounce the letter “r” and was 6’5″ tall.

Wood, as he was then known, became a member of the British Parliament in 1910, holding office until 1925. At this time, he became Lord Irwin. He was Viceroy of India between 1926 and 1931.

In 1934, he inherited his father’s title, becoming Viscount Halifax. In 1938, he became Foreign Minister in Neville Chamberlain’s government, becoming one of the principal architects of the policy of appeasement of Hitler, and then advocating that Britain go to war to defend Poland.

In 1940, Halifax advocated making peace with Germany, who were in the process of overrunning Western Europe and encircling British troops at Dunkirk. After a long debate, Winston Churchill’s preference to fight on won out. Halifax was then appointed Ambassador to the United States, a post that he held between late 1940 and 1946.

In 1944, he was ennobled further, becoming the first Earl of Halifax. His grandson, the third Earl of Halifax, was considered a suitable husband for Princess Anne at one point. The third Earl wound up marrying a woman who was formerly known as Camilla Parker Bowles, but not the woman who was formerly known as Camilla Parker Bowles who is now married to Prince Charles. This Camilla was married to a different Parker Bowles brother; the two Camillas were sisters-in-law once upon a time.

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How to throw the javelin

Here’s a picture from the photo page of the April 25 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star that features a young man and a javelin.

Barney Berlinger (1908-2002) wound up not competing at the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics, as he was recovering from a sore back and was just starting a new job. He compensated by defeating the Olympic decathlon winner, Jim Bausch, in a seven-event competition at Madison Square Garden.

Berlinger started working for Quaker City Gear Works in 1932, and retired from the firm in 1978, having become its president. His son, Barney Jr., became a college football quarterback. Father and son were inducted into the University of Pennsylvania athletics hall of fame together.

A Google search for Sue Dougherty turned up nothing that matched the woman in the photo.

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Final clearance sale

Here’s an ad from the April 25 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star for an upcoming art auction.

When I saw this, I was reminded of this ad, so I wondered whether this highly important collection of oil paintings and water colors was legit. The answer appears to be “sort of”. There really was an A. Luscombe Carroll, and there really was a Carroll Gallery in London; references to the gallery appear in print from about 1922 (or possibly earlier) to about 1938. However, it is not clear that all of the Canadian stock of the Carroll Galleries was being auctioned in Toronto, given that there were similar auctions in Vancouver and Winnipeg, among other places. Maybe they were transporting the art from place to place.

I traced Ward Price Limited and W. Ward Price in the Toronto city directories as best as I could. Mr. Price appears in the 1932 and 1933 directories, but is missing from other directories in the 1930s. He reappears in the 1941 and 1942 directories as residing in a house on Lonsdale Road in Forest Hill, but is not listed in the 1943 directory. Ward Price Limited (sometimes listed as Ward-Price Limited or Ward-Price (Downtown) Limited), appears at 111 King West as late as 1943, but the 1944 directory lists the address as Vacant.

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Hollywood just madhouse

Here’s a short article from the April 25 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star that interviewed writer and actress Cornelia Otis Skinner.

Cornelia Otis Skinner (1899-1979) was the child of two actors, and started a career on the stage in 1921. In the late 1920s, she toured the United States performing short character sketches. Four collections of her “monologue-dramas” and eight collections of her essays were published between 1932 and 1958.

YouTube has a number of recordings of her recitals of poems; here’s one from 1941. She appeared on What’s My Line? in 1959.