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Ukelele surprise

I included this bit of filler from the February 18 1927 edition of the Toronto Daily Star because it was a bit unusual.

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I suspect that Mr. Watson was not invited to any future surprise parties.

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12-year-old university student

Sometimes, the photo section of the Toronto Daily Star offers up an unfathomable mystery. Consider this picture, from the February 18 1927 Toronto Daily Star:

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Obviously, young Robert was extremely brilliant, if he could pass university entrance exams at the age of 12. But why did he have only four years of schooling at that age? Did he start late? Did he suffer an illness that forced him to miss time? We’ll never know.

A search for Robert Nagler turned up his Find A Grave memorial, but provided no information on his academic career, if he had one.

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Squash stars

The February 18 1927 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained this photograph of American and British squash stars:

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“De Sibour” is almost certainly Henri L. De Sibour; an American squash player of that name participated in the Latham Cup in 1930. J. H. de Sibour, the American architect, had a son named Henri Louis, so it’s probably the same guy. I couldn’t find out much about him.

Victor Cazalet (1896-1943) was a Conservative member of Parliament in Britain from 1924 to his death in 1943 in a plane crash. Queen Victoria was his godmother, and he was Elizabeth Taylor’s godfather.

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Marchioness of Queensberry

The February 18 1927 edition of the Toronto Daily Star had a photo of the Marchioness of Queensberry, who was inspecting the portraits that she had painted that were hung in an art gallery in New York:

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Cathleen Mann (1896-1959) had been the Marchioness of Queensberry for a little less than a year when this photo was taken. She went on to become a costume designer for a number of films between 1933 and 1937, and became an official war artist, painting portraits of Allied commanders. She and the Marquis divorced in 1946, and she committed suicide in 1959.

Her Wikipedia page states that she saved many lives in the West Ham district of London during the war by commandeering transport to carry people to safety. Which is more than many of us have done, to be honest.

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Prize-winning architecture

The February 18 1927 edition of the Toronto Daily Star had a photo of a house that won an Ontario architects’ award:

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This house still stands.

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Isabelle Sheridan

The July 27 1927 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained this photo of Isabelle Sheridan. She was a cousin of the famous Mary Pickford, and she was about to hopefully become a movie star as well.

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Unfortunately, Ms. Sheridan did not achieve the success that she might have been hoping for. The Internet Movie Database shows her as having been cast as an extra in one other movie two years later, and then working as a stand-in in several productions in the 1930s. She passed away in 1996 at the age of 90.

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Darwin to Melbourne

The July 27 1927 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained a bit of filler about a man who drove from Darwin to Melbourne in Australia – an exceptional feat for that era.

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Google Maps informs me that a modern-day Dunkerley can now travel from Darwin to Melbourne by car in 40 hours. The modern trip is considerably shorter now: instead of 3380 miles, which is 5440 kilometres, you now only need to drive 3753 kilometres.

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Polo and Danzig

Newspapers in the 1920s included lots of filler articles to ensure that every tightly-filled column on every page was complete. The July 27 1927 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained two of the more obscure bits I’ve seen so far.

First, there was the sad tale of an unfortunate pony:

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And you could now call the Free City of Danzig from England:

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The Free City of Danzig existed from 1920 to 1939, until being overcome by the Nazis during the Second World War. It is now known as Gdansk, and is part of Poland.

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White Rose gasoline

The March 15 1927 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained an ad for White Rose gasoline:

This ad is interesting to me mostly because there used to be a ghost sign for White Rose gasoline on the side of a building on Broadview Avenue just south of Danforth (I used to live in that neighbourhood). A Google Street View closeup from 2011 shows the ad – the last two lines of the ad read “White Rose Motor Gasoline”. You can’t tell from this, but the ad also mentions En-ar-ca motor oil.

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Foxhall Daingerfield

The March 15 1927 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained an excerpt from The Linden Walk Tragedy, a novel by a man named Foxhall Daingerfield:

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Because Mr. Daingerfield has such an awesome name, I looked him up on Google. There have been actually at least two Foxhall Daingerfields in existence. The older Daingerfield is mentioned here – he appears to have been an ancestor of the younger Daingerfield, who lived a comparatively short lifespan: 1887 to 1933.

The Linden Walk Tragedy was eventually published in 1929. Another of Daingerfield’s works, The Southern Cross, is available online.