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Poor King Gustav

Newspaper typesetters of the past clearly had access to a handy supply of odd little bits of filler, which they could use to fill gaps in pages. The April 22 1925 Toronto Daily Star included this item:

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King Gustav V (or Gustaf V) may have had a brief attack of stomach trouble in 1925, but he went on to live a long life: he died in 1950 at the age of 91 after reigning in Sweden for nearly 43 years. He played competitive tennis for his country under the alias “Mr. G”.

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Magistrate’s belief

The April 21 1925 Toronto Daily Star contained an unusual bit of jurisprudence:

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If a modern judge suggested that a young woman be locked up for a week and given a series of spankings, it would be all over Twitter.

I’m not sure whether the judge was being compassionate when she remanded Ms. Mayne to the care of her mother. I guess it would depend on whether it was the mother-daughter relationship that drove her to being “found in a resort”.

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Returning to business

The April 21 1925 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained this brief advertisement:

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Naturally, I was curious: how long did Mr. Graham’s establishment last at its new location? Unfortunately, not long: Graham’s Restaurant is listed in the 1926 Toronto city directory but not in the 1927 directory. This is sort of sad: the restaurant had been at its old location since at least 1912 (when it was the Graham Brothers restaurant).

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Marion Talley

The photo section for the April 21 1925 edition of the Toronto Daily Star had this entry:

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Wikipedia has an entry for Marion Talley: after using Kansas City money to study in New York and Italy, she was hired for the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 1925, becoming the youngest prima donna to sing there (this record was broken in 1943). Their general manager hoped that her debut would be low-key, but 200 leading Kansas City citizens, proud of their native daughter, arrived by special train, and a telegraph was set up backstage so that her father could send dispatches to the Associated Press. She also made her radio and film debuts in that year.

Unfortunately, it went downhill from there. Film critics panned her inexperience and claimed she was not photogenic. (You can decide for yourself – her Vitaphone short from 1927 is here.) She appeared in only seven more Metropolitan Opera productions before being let go in 1929. She eventually retired from show business, was married and divorced twice, and died in 1983.