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Chicken rustlers

From the September 28 1927 Toronto Globe:

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So if I read this correctly, two men stole 70 chickens and four ducks from farms in Brantford and Woodstock, and then drove all the way to St. Lawrence Market in Toronto, in a 1927 vehicle, with all 74 fowl in the vehicle with them? That was a tremendous, albeit criminal, achievement.

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Oofy Glue

Here’s a piece that appeared in the February 15 1924 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

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I think Oofy Glue appeared regularly in the Daily Star at that time – I’ll have to double-check. A Google search turned up nothing at all  – Oofy, whoever he is, has been lost to history. Perhaps it’s just as well.

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Lhevinne

Here’s a notice that appeared in the February 15 1924 Toronto Daily Star:

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I’m reasonably certain that this refers to Josef Lhévinne (1874-1944), a Russian-born pianist and piano teacher. Considered a master of piano technique, he wrote a book, Basic Principles in Pianoforte Playing, which appeared in 1924.

His real surname was actually Levin; an early manager changed it because “Lhévinne” sounded more distinctive and less Jewish.

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Fanny Parker Candies

Here’s an ad from the February 15 1924 Toronto Daily Star:

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A Google search for “Fanny Parker Candies” turned up nothing, but it did reveal that Fanny Parker (1875-1924) was a member of the Scottish suffragette movement who took part in increasingly militant actions. She appears to have had nothing to do with the candies of the same name – and, in fact, naming a candy after her seems singularly inappropriate, since she was sometimes force-fed by the authorities after going on hunger strikes.

My guess is that “Fanny Parker” was intended to sound like Fanny Farmer, a chain of American candy stores (founded by the same person who originated the Laura Secord chain in Canada).

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The truth

From the October 1 1928 Toronto Daily Star:

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Doctors say it takes 100% bran to relieve constipation! 93% or 97% is not sufficient!

Two Kellogg brothers, John Harvey and Will Keith, invented the process of making flaked cereal at the Battle Creek Sanitarium, a holistic treatment centre that promoted vegetarianism, nutrition, exercise, hydrotherapy, the use of enemas, and abstinence from alcohol, tobacco, and all forms of sexual activity. (John’s Wikipedia entry helpfully points out that “Kellogg’s views on sexuality and masturbation are now considered extreme.”)

W. K. started the Kellogg company after a sanitarium guest, C. W. Post, took notes on how the Kelloggs made their cereal and then started his own cereal company. Apparently, “this upset Will to the extent that he left the sanitarium to found his own company.” I can’t say as I blame him! The Kellogg brothers may have led austere lives by modern standards, but I guess it paid off: they both lived for 91 years. And you can still buy All-Bran in your grocery store.

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Specially blended for Toronto water

Here’s an ad from the October 1 1928 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

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I’m not sure about the specially blended for Toronto part, given that J. Lyons & Co. were tea manufacturers based in England.

Lyons became a corporate empire, eventually expanding to manufacturing food, running tea shops and restaurants, and even manufacturing their own computers. Former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher worked there as a chemist at one time. The company fell on hard times starting in the 1960s and was eventually broken up and sold to various firms.

But I wonder: what would tea specially blended for Toronto water taste like?

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Do you want a diamond?

From the Toronto Daily Star, February 15 1924:

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I’m sure that the seller obtained his goods in an entirely legitimate manner.

By the way, I’m fascinated by the letter and numbering system that appears next to some ads. What does “1.2.3.5.F.15” mean?

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Ice cream by tricycles

Here’s a bit of filler from the October 1, 1928 Toronto Daily Star:

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I love this article – it has both too much detail and too little. We don’t know the name of the ice cream manufacturer, or which British towns the fleet operates in, but we do know that it contains 1100 tricycles.

A search for “ice cream tricycle 1928” uncovered this site, which suggests that the manufacturer might have been Wall’s. The photographs are fascinating. (Wall’s ice cream still exists, but the brand has been swallowed up by Unilever.)