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Marriage by proxy

The May 19 1915 edition of the Toronto Daily Star reported that marriage by proxy was a concept in use during the First World War, at least in France. This is where a bride pledged her vows to a groom who was away at the front, with a proxy standing in at the ceremony to speak the groom’s part. Here’s the article:

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To me, this seems sad beyond words. I have no idea what happened to M. Lorin and Mlle. Martigny (who I guess became Mme. Lorin). I hope he returned home to her and they had many happy years together. I hope that Monsieur Firmin Souq also found someone to share his life with.

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Treacherous as a submarine

Submarines were first in common use in the early 1900s, and were generally known about by the First World War. Which is why the May 19 1915 edition of the Toronto Daily Star could feature this ad:

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We’ve run into Abbey’s Effervescent Salt before – there was a somewhat cryptic ad for it here. This ad features a testimonial from the Medical Officer of Health for London, England! (Not to be confused with the Medical Officer of Health for London, Ontario.) He wouldn’t lie to you, would he?

What’s interesting is that Abbey’s is available in two sizes: the 25-cent bottle if you plan on being only a little stopped up, or the 60-cent version if you are in regular need.

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Whose car is this?

The May 19 1915 edition of the Toronto Daily Star had this picture in it:

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My first guess is that this driver got into a hit-and-run collision. But if this had happened, there would not have been a stationary shot of this car. So I don’t know what happened, and I guess I will never know.

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Gain or lose weight

Recently, I took a look at the May 19 1915 edition of the Toronto Daily Star. It contained ads for a product that helped you gain weight, and a product that helped you lose it.

First, the gainer:

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Advertisements for products that help you gain weight seem strange nowadays, but a lot of people were having trouble getting enough to eat back then.

If you were having enough to eat, or perhaps too much, this day’s paper had an option for you too:

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I don’t know what would happen if someone tried to take Certone and Resia at the same time. Which side would win?

What’s interesting to me is how wordy these ads were. People had time on their hands – there was no television or radio back then – and so were willing to read a lot more details than we are.