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Heiress to Dutch throne

Here’s a photograph from the November 8 1933 edition of the Toronto Daily Star of the heiress to the throne of the Netherlands.

Juliana of the Netherlands (1909-2004) held the Dutch throne from 1948 until abdicating in favour of her daughter in 1980. During the Second World War, Juliana lived in exile in Canada.

While overseas, she gave birth to her third daughter, Margriet. To ensure that the newborn remained in the line of succession to the throne, part of the Ottawa Civic Hospital was temporarily designated as belonging to the Netherlands. When she returned home after the war, she gave Ottawa 100,000 tulip bulbs as a thank-you gesture.

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Arrested as spy

The photo page of the November 8 1933 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained these photographs of women arrested in Finland as part of a spy ring.

A search didn’t turn up much, and what I could find was behind paywalls, but it seems that Mary Louise Martin (also referred to as Marie Louise Martin) was the head of a group of Soviet spies. She was sentenced to eight years in prison, and her confederates (presumably including Mrs. Jacobson) were given lesser sentences.

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No ice cream

Here’s a picture from the photo page of the October 25 1938 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

Photos of attractive women have been included in newspapers since it became technologically possible, of course, but I’m mystified by the caption. It refers to three pretty chefs, but there are four women in this photograph.

I guess that the three women on the right are dumping in another bushel basket, and the one on the left isn’t being counted because she is raking the apples. But it does look like the caption is implying that one of the women is not a chef, or one of the women is not pretty. Or perhaps the caption writer isn’t good at counting – who knows?

Wenatchee, Washington is still referred to as the Apple Capital of the World. Their professional baseball team is the Wenatchee Applesox, so their emotional connection to apples obviously runs deep.

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Married forty years

Here’s a short society announcement from the October 25 1938 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

When I see one of these, I sometimes like to morbidly trace the couple in the Toronto city directories to see how many more wedding anniversaries they celebrated. In the case of the Moores, it looks like they were around for a while: there is a William G. Moore at 310 Westmoreland Avenue as late as 1953. The 1954 directory lists his widow.

There’s a possibility that this might be two William G. Moores, father and son, since William G. Moore was not employed between 1938 and 1942, but was working at Belyea Brothers between 1943 and 1953. But I couldn’t tell for sure.

As for Hunt’s, the location of the special occasion: I’m a bit mystified about that too, as Hunt’s is listed in the 1938 city directory as a chain of confectioners. Perhaps they had room for a dinner party at one of their locations.

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Dean of Canterbury weds

Here’s a brief blurb from the October 25 1938 edition of the Toronto Daily Star about what could be called a May-December romance:

Hewlett Johnson (1874-1966) was a zealous supporter of the Soviet Union. He published a collection of pro-Soviet articles, The Socialist Sixth of the World, in 1939; it was later discovered that much of this book was copied word for word from various Soviet propaganda sources.

His marriage to the former Nowell Edwards (who was his second cousin) produced two daughters. As far as I know, the couple stayed together until his death. She passed away in 1983.

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Rheumatic pain gone

I’m always fascinated by testimonial ads that feature real people. Here’s one from the October 25 1938 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

Mosby’s Tonic has been discussed before in this blog, but there are two things that I find interesting about this version of the Mosby’s ad:

  • To fit the second line of the headline into the available space, the typesetter used the number 0 instead of the letter O. It looks a little odd, but it’s narrower. (Here’s another example of this.)
  • A “MOSBY’S TONIC Man” was apparently at the Tamblyn drug store at Keele and Dundas. Was he there full-time?

I looked up Mr. John S. Stevenson of 227 St. John’s Road in the Toronto city directories. Sure enough, he was there, and he had no listed occupation, so I assume that he was actually retired. I looked ahead and found him at the same address in the 1943 and 1948 city directories. So we know for sure that Mosby’s Tonic didn’t kill Mr. Stevenson, at least not right away.

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Health and athletic club

Here’s an ad that appeared in the October 21 1935 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

I looked The Health Club up in the Toronto city directories. It first appears in the 1936 directory as the Toronto Health Club, located on the third floor of 2 Toronto Street. In 1937, the club moved to the second floor of this building, and Fernley J. Bull was listed as its director.

By 1939, the club was gone. Its space was taken over by two barristers and by the Automotive Transport Association of Ontario, the Canadian Automotive Transportation Association, and the Toronto Milk Transport Association. The building at 2 Toronto Street still stands.

Robert E. Bernier was not listed in the 1938 city directory, but a Blanche Bernier was listed at 107 Springdale Boulevard. Robert E. then appears in the 1939 directory at 105 Springdale, and is not listed in the 1940 directory. My guess is that Blanche and Robert were relatives, Robert was about to head off to fight and needed a place to stay, and Blanche knew that her neighbour was looking to take on a boarder.

Mr. Bull wasn’t listed in the 1939 or 1940 directories either. My guess is that if you were fit enough to run a health club, you were able and willing to fight the Axis Powers.

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Elected president

I am always fascinated by pictures of people being honoured for some achievement or other. Here’s one from the October 25 1938 edition of the Toronto Daily Star, of a man who had just been appointed president of the Dufferin Old Boys’ association.

I think this refers to people who went to Lord Dufferin Public School in Toronto, but I’m not sure.

Because I was curious, I looked up George A. Keates in the Toronto city directories. The 1938 directory lists him as working as the assistant treasurer at Terminal Warehouses Limited. By 1944, he had become the division manager there, but he is not listed in the 1945 directory. This directory doesn’t list his widow, so I have no idea whether he passed away or moved elsewhere.

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Injured actor (2 of 2)

Here’s the second of two posts from the October 25 1938 edition of the Toronto Daily Star about an actor who had suffered an injury. This time, it’s Canadian-born actress Margaret Bannerman, who sustained facial injuries in an accident.

Margaret Bannerman (1896-1976) appeared in silent films in Britain between 1917 and 1920. She moved to the United States in the 1930s and appeared in movies until 1947. She eventually retired to an actors’ home in Englewood, New Jersey.

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Injured actor (1 of 2)

The October 25 1938 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained two separate reports of actors who were injured in accidents. I’ll do the first one today, which is of actor Lyle Talbot escaping a fire.

Lyle Talbot (1902-1996) not only recovered from his injuries – he lived for nearly 58 years after the fire, and appeared in various television series well into the 1980s. Among his accomplishments, he was a co-founder of the Screen Actors Guild and played Ozzie Nelson’s friend and neighbour on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet for ten years. He claimed that he never refused a part that was offered to him, which led to him appearing in some notoriously bad films.

Talbot was married five times. His first four marriages were brief, but then he married actress and singer Paula Epple when he was 46 and she was 20. Not only did their marriage last – they were married for over forty years and had four children – he outlived her, as she passed away in 1989.