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Window cleaner killed

Here’s a short sad story from the September 16 1946 edition of the Toronto Globe and Mail:

Presumably, this sort of accident is why window cleaners now work on hoists outside the building, rather than clinging to the building the way that poor late Mr. Thompson did.

I found Samuel Thompson in the 1946 Toronto city directory: his occupation is listed as “window clk Can Perm Mort”. The Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation is listed at 320 Bay, so I’m not sure if this is the same place.

One final thought on this sad event: the “Path of Fall” photo and diagram in this article is (a) somewhat ghoulish, and (b) somewhat obvious. Doesn’t most falling happen in a downward direction?

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Canadian Cavalcade

Here’s an ad in the September 16 1946 edition of the Toronto Globe and Mail for a CBC radio program titled Canadian Cavalcade:

I couldn’t find anything on Canadian Cavalcade, but I did find some information on the people mentioned in this ad:

  • Jean Dickenson sang at the Metropolitan Opera in 1940. YouTube has recordings of her singing “Caro Nome” in 1940 and “Mazurka” in about 1945 (the latter is from the American Album of Familiar Music).
  • Dixie Dean (1916-1987), the accordion player, is not to be confused with Dixie Dean, the famous British soccer player. The accordion playing Dixie was an instructor and composer when not appearing on the radio.
  • Howard Cable (1920-2016) lived for nearly 70 years after this ad appeared. He is best known for composing the original theme for Hockey Night in Canada, which was used from 1952 until 1968. He also created a piano solo arrangement of the second Hockey Night in Canada theme; the orchestral version of this (which Cable did not arrange) which ran from 1968 until the mid-2000s.
  • Cy Mack (1905-1979) was born Francis Cyril McElhiney in Springhill, Nova Scotia, which is also the place where Anne Murray was born.
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Deductions for “payment”

The September 16 1946 edition of the Toronto Globe and Mail contained this notice from the Department of National Revenue, as it was then called:

I’ve read this several times, and I have no idea what it means.

The Income War Tax Act was created in 1917; it called for what was then considered a temporary income tax to help fund spending for the First World War.

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After 33 years

The September 11 1930 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained photographs of the recovery of a Swedish man who died in 1897 while attempting to travel to the North Pole by hydrogen balloon.

Salomon August Andrée (1854-1897) apparently passed away either from trichinosis or from carbon monoxide poisoning. The recovery of his body and that of the others on his expedition was a grand event in Sweden; they received a state funeral at which King Gustaf V spoke.

In more recent years, researchers have come to believe that attempting to travel to the pole by balloon was an ill-advised idea, and that the expedition died needlessly.

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Misogynistic filler

Old editions of the Toronto Daily Star always contained a bunch of short filler articles that were about two or three lines long, thus allowing the typesetter to completely fill every column. Whoever was writing some of the filler for the September 11 1930 edition of the paper was someone who didn’t particularly like women:

Yes, I know they’re just jokes, but yeesh.

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Godfather to Hapsburg baby

Here’s one more photo from the September 8 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star, featuring a prince of Austria being held by the former king of Spain.

The infant in the photo was Archduke Stefan of Austria (1932-1998), a great-great-grandson of Queen Victoria. Born in Austria, he and his family moved to Romania in 1942. When his cousin, King Michael of Romania, was forced to abdicate in 1947, he lived in Switzerland, Argentina, and then finally in the United States, where he settled.

The archduke eventually became an American citizen and established a division of advanced research at General Motors in Detroit, which is probably not what he expected to be doing with his life when he was living as a prince in Austria.

King Alfonso XIII of Spain (1886-1941) became king at birth, his father having died before he was born. He was granted full powers of kingship in 1902, and abdicated in 1931 when the Second Republic was formed.

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Princess seeks divorce

Here’s a photo from the September 8 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

Avril Joy Mullens (1909-1978) married two more times after divorcing His Serene Highness Prince George Imeretinsky (whom she married when she was 16). She married Brigadier General Hugh Nugent Leveson-Gower and then married Ernest Aldrich Simpson; the latter was the ex-husband of Wallis Simpson, who later became the Duchess of Windsor. Ms. Mullens passed away in Mexico after an automobile crash.

Despite all of this, Ms. Mullens was not the most notorious sibling in her family. Her older sister, Elvira Enid Barney (1904-1936), who used the stage name of Dolores Ashley, was dramatically acquitted of murdering her lover in 1932. Ms. Barney was later disowned by her family and was found dead in a hotel room in Paris on Christmas Day, 1936. The Steeple Times website provides a highly unflattering portrait of her.

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Miss America 1932

The photo section of the September 8 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contains this photograph of a young woman who had just been crowned Miss America.

The photo is reproduced as shown in the paper; clearly, Ms. Hann’s image was reversed, presumably because she appeared on the right-hand edge of the page and the editor wanted her legs to face inwards.

Dorothy Hann‘s title of Miss America for 1932 was apparently unofficial. No Miss America had been crowned since 1927, and the title was not officially revived until 1933. She appears to have led an uncontroversial life: she was widowed in 1982, and passed away in 1990 in her home town of Camden, New Jersey.

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Quarrel forgotten

Here’s a publicity photo from the September 8 1932 edition of the Toronto Daily Star, featuring singer Rudy Vallée and his wife, who were now reconciled:

Vallée and his wife, Fay Webb, were not reconciled for long, as they separated in 1933. Vallée’s Wikipedia page states that, during the divorce proceedings, Ms. Webb claimed that “Vallée is possessed of a violent, vicious, and ungovernable temper, and given to the use of blasphemy and the use of intemperate, vile, and vituperative language.”

The two were divorced in 1936, and Ms. Webb passed away shortly afterwards from complications following stomach surgery. Vallée married two more times; his final marriage, to Eleanor Norris, lasted from 1949 until his death in 1986.

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Charming home

Here’s a photo from the September 6 1935 edition of the Toronto Daily Star of a house being built in the Wychwood neighbourhood.

It took me a bit of poking around on Google Street View before I found this house. It still stands, though it has been refinished.

A search in the Toronto city directories didn’t provide information on who ordered the house to be built. The address is almost certainly 53 Strathearn Road, but it is listed in the 1936, 1937, and 1938 directories as vacant. It finally has an occupant in 1939, but I have no idea whether this was the original owner.