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How tired are you?

Here’s a photo from the May 5 1933 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

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A search for Dr. Donald Laird turned up:

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Everybody will be kissed

The May 5 1933 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained this promotion for an upcoming baseball game:

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I searched in the 1933 and 1934 Toronto city directories, and I could find no reference to Viaduct Park. There was a baseball stadium at this location in the 1950s, but it’s not the same one. Perhaps they just set up some seats in Riverdale Park and invited the public to attend and, if preferred, be kissed.

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Dine out!

Here’s an ad from the May 1 1931 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

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A search of the Toronto city directories indicates that the Green Parrot Cafe was new in town – it wasn’t listed in the 1931 city directory. It is listed in the 1932 directory as the Green Parrot Grill, but it didn’t do too well – it was not listed in the 1933 directory. Today, the Zanzibar Tavern strip club is located at that address.

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Checkered schoolhouse

Here’s an item from the photo page of the May 1 1931 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

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A Google search turned up this article on the Franklinville checkered schoolhouse, which stated that it formerly was located at the corner of Route 98 and Kingsbury Road. Google Street View shows a house at that location; I couldn’t tell if was formerly the schoolhouse.

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After their recent marriage

Here’s a photo from the May 1 1931 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

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Clodagh Pamela Bowes-Lyon didn’t do anything interesting enough to merit a Wikipedia page, but I did find a reference to her. (Unlike this woman, she was a genuine Bowes-Lyon.) Like her cousin, she was long-lived, passing away in 2003. She outlived Lord Douglas-Hamilton by 39 years, and outlived her second husband, Tresham Joseph Philip Lever, 2nd Bart., by 28 years.

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Party has first test

Here’s an article about a by-election in Britain in 1931:

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The New Party was in existence for this 1931 by-election and for the general election later that year. Its candidate, Allan Young, finished third in this by-election with 16.0% of the vote. In the election later that year, the New Party did even worse in this constituency, collecting only 1.4% of the vote.

Oswald Mosley (1896-1980) soon grew enamored of fascism, and merged the New Party with British pro-fascists to form the British Union of Fascists in 1932. This party was disbanded in 1940, when Mosley and many of its other members were interned.

P. G. Wodehouse‘s Jeeves novels included a caricature of Mosley, named Roderick Spode.

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John Gresham’s Girl

The April 27 1931 edition of the Toronto Daily Star contained this ad for a novel that the paper was about to serialize.

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I wouldn’t put “marry someone’s daughter” high up on the list of ways I would revenge myself on someone. But, then again (fortunately), I’ve never felt the need to revenge myself on anyone.

Concordia Merrel (1885-1962) was an actress, photographer’s model, and prolific romance novelist, producing at least thirty novels between 1924 and 1935. John Gresham’s Girl (not to be confused with John Grisham) was written in 1926. Ms. Merrel wrote and/or performed under a stage name or pseudonym; her real name was Mary Phyllis Joan Logan, which sounds less exotic.

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Vandals cause havoc

Here’s a brief article from the April 27 1931 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

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These were determined vandals: not only did they damage goods, they tried to set fire to the building.

I was curious, so I looked up the Latest Fashion Dress Co. in the Toronto city directories. The 1931 directory lists Latest Fashion Dress Co at 217-219 Richmond West, with Samuel Ludwig as the proprietor. The 1934 directory lists them on the first floor of the building at 24 Spadina Avenue. They were also there in 1935.

In 1936, Samuel Ludwig and Joseph Wiseman joined forces to form the Fashionable Dress Company, setting up shop at 116 Spadina. The company still existed in 1939, but by 1944, Mr. Ludwig was part of a company called Royal Valet Service that offered cleaning and pressing. I didn’t trace him after that.

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Films die with her

Here’s a brief article from the April 27 1931 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

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Mary Pickford (1892-1979) eventually changed her mind about destroying her films after her death. In 1970, she donated 50 of her early films to the American Film Institute. She revised her will in 1971 to donate most of her estate to the Mary Pickford Foundation.

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Youngest in the House

Here’s a photo from the April 22 1929 edition of the Toronto Daily Star:

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At first, I thought that the boy in the middle of the photo was the youngest member of the House of Representatives; it’s actually the man on the right.

Fred A. Hartley Jr. (1902-1969) served in the House of Representatives for twenty years from 1929 to 1949, serving ten terms as a representative. He is best-known for being the co-sponsor of the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947, which imposed restrictions on labour rights and gave individual states the right to enact right-to-work laws.